On the death of a corporal


Carol Off
The following link is to a CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Company) interview that was on yesterdays radio program As it Happens. The subject of the interview was a bystander’s response to Wednesday’s terrorist killing of 24-year-old Corporal Nathan Carillo, who was on honorary guard duty at the Canadian National War Memorial. The interviewer is Carol Off and the interviewee Barbara Winter. I envy Carol’s ability to carry on so admirably through an interview that left me wrecked, and I especially envy Barbara Winter’s ability to be emotionally present, both with the dying corporal and on an internationally broadcast radio program. How I wish I could remain so in touch with the best that is within me.

Barbara Winter

14 comments:

Paula Kaye said...

She is a hero as well. I do not think I could have turned and ran back after I heard the shots. Truly a tragic event

Snowbrush said...

"She is a hero as well. I do not think I could have turned and ran back after I heard the shots."

Yes, but I took relatively little notice of that because, as a man, I would have found it easier to run toward gunshots than to allow myself to say the things she said, not just at the time, but on international radio. Yet, they were perfect when they were first said, and they were perfect in repetition, and this doesn't make being a man look like such a great thing.

CreekHiker / HollysFolly said...

Wow

kylie said...

Snow,
You have shown deep vulnerability in the things you have said here at times. I think you are way underestimating yourself.

TICKLEBEAR said...

Thanks for that link.
Because I don't listen much to radio,
I missed this.
You can imagine the mood that reigned here in Canada. My own personal reaction is complex, a hearth break and anger, but I trust my fellow Canadians will stand together and not let this defeat them.

Charles Gramlich said...

Don't think I can handle this at the moment. I'm feeling in a pretty good mood this morning but I know it is delicate.

Rob-bear said...

That was a very un-Canadian day in Canada. It was on tv, live, for hours, as the story unfolded. I watched most of it. But I missed the "As It Happens" piece. Thanks for sharing that, Snow.

Rob-bear said...

P.S.: I have some pictures and cartoons that are also Canadian responses to the Wednesday tragedy. If I had you email, I could send them to you.

Stephen Hayes said...

As hard as this is to listen to, I'm glad there are people like this in the world who can reach out and do the right thing when circumstances call for it.

Snowbrush said...

"You have shown deep vulnerability in the things you have said here at times. I think you are way underestimating yourself."

I'm aware that I share more in the way of personal things than most bloggers, but although I often feel vulnerable within myself as I'm writing, I don't feel vulnerable to the reactions of my readers once a piece is posted. This is because I'm very good at not taking people's reactions to my writing personally. It's also true that I usually enjoy negative comments because they're rarely attacking of me but rather of my ideas, and I find that stimulating. I even take it as a compliment that they cared enough to share their thoughts. Being as open in person as I am on my blog would represent a far greater challenge. This is mostly because most people wouldn't welcome it. On my blog, I know that I'm not entrapping anyone, but am horrified to think that I might be telling someone (in person) more about me than they would want to know. It's also possible, in my writing, for me to portray myself with more completeness and clarity than I could in person. I could live without face-to-face conversation far easier than without written conversation.

"I trust my fellow Canadians will stand together and not let this defeat them."

I'm so glad you came by because I've missed you and would like to follow your blog again. Here in America, the response to terrorism has largely consisted of stupidity, nationalism, trillions of wasted dollars, disinterest in more pressing issues at home, and a loss of freedom known as the "Patriot Act" (the government always names things the opposite of what they are). Now, we've become callous to it. Just this week, we've had a school shooting, and two cops were attacked with a hatchet, but neither has aroused anything like the response you've had in Canada to your two recent attacks. We've simply gotten used to such things, and have no hope that they can be stopped, or that our government will do anything but the wrong thing in response to them.

"I missed the "As It Happens" piece."

I listen to a lot of public radio down here, and there are two daily Canadian shows, "Q" and "As it Happens." The latter is my favorite weekday show, partly because the American programs tend to be recyclings of the same two or three or news stories."

"If I had you email, I could send them to you."

We used to have one another's emails, but I guess we've both lost them. I'll be in touch.

"I'm glad there are people like this in the world who can reach out and do the right thing when circumstances call for it."

Especially when they're the ones who are on the scene. How I wish we had a Roosevelt instead of a Bush and an Obama.

Elephant's Child said...

Tears here. And awe. What an incredible woman. Thank you.

possum said...

I had to shut it off... she started to cry, so did I.
She is an amazing woman.
Thanks for sharing, Snow.
I can only hope that I would have that kind of strength... but I hope even more that I would never need it.

Helen said...

'How I wish I could remain so in touch with the best that is within me' ~ I believe this is what makes you so refreshing, intriguing .. You are candid, honest AND in touch!

Kerry said...

Wow.This was very up close and personal. If my son were shot, how I wish there would be a Barbara there for him. For us all.